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Faculty Associates in Research

Ryadi Adityavarman

Ryadi Adityavarman

Kansas State University

Ryadi Adityavarman is an Associate Professor in Interior Architecture and Product Design at Kansas State University. Adityavarman has a multidisciplinary academic background including architecture, interior design, and historic preservation with professional practice experience in international projects from furniture to large scale building design.

Matthew H. Amster

Matthew Amster

Assistant Professor, Gettysburg College

I am a cultural anthropologist and filmmaker with extensive experience working in Borneo and, more recently, have started a new project doing research in Denmark. My research in Borneo was among the Kelabit of Sarawak, where I conducted fieldwork in both in both rural and urban settings, exploring many facets of Kelabit life, with special focus on religious conversion and change, urban ethnicity, gossip and social networks, the key role of the international border in Kelabit rural life.

Christopher Bjork

Christopher Bjork

Professor, Vassar College

Christopher Bjork earned his B.A. in English and his M.A. in liberal studies from Wesleyan University. He completed his Ph.D. in educational anthropology at Stanford University. Certified to teach both elementary and secondary school, he has worked as a classroom teacher in Japan and the United States.

Cathrene Connery

Cathrene Connery

Senior Lecturer, Central Washington University

M. Cathrene Connery, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Education at Central Washington University. A bilingual educator, researcher and advocate, she has drawn on her visual arts education as a painter to inform her research and professional activities in language, literacy, and sociocultural studies. Connery has presented on theoretical, pedagogic, and programmatic concerns surrounding the education of culturally and linguistically diverse children in the United States for the more than 25 years.

Pilipa Esara

Pilapa Esara

Associate Professor, SUNY - Brockport

Areas of Specialization

Issues of displacement and refugee resettlement; ethnographic documentary production; gender inequality and social difference; social practices of marriage and intimacy; processes of migration and identity negotiations; economic development and globalization; Asia and its diasporas

Jennifer Gaynor

Jennifer Gaynor

Assistant Professor, University of Buffalo - SUNY

Research Interests

Social and cultural history of modern Indonesia and maritime Southeast Asia, historiography and the intersections of history and anthropology

Thomas Gibson

Thomas Gibson

Professor, University of Rochester

Professor Gibson’s first field research project concerned the relationship between the egalitarian and pacifist values of the Buid, an indigenous people inhabiting the highlands of Mindoro, Philippines, and the hierarchical and aggressive values of the Christian and Muslim societies found in the lowlands (1986).  He followed this up with a comparative study of attitudes toward violence and aggression among shifting cultivators throughout Southeast Asia, showing that they varied according to historical exposure of different groups to raiding by lowland and coastal societies (1990).

Jack Harris

Jack Harris

Professor, Hobart & William Smith College

I have been studying men and masculinity in Vietnam for many years, and have expanded into looking at the experience of Vietnamese as they go through massive economic and social change. In addition I am an applied sociologist and consult to local governments across the United States on business process reengineering, change management, and municipal information technology.

Nori Katagiri

Nori Katagiri

Assistant Professor, Saint Louis University

Dr. Nori Katagiri is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Saint Louis University. He teaches and conducts research on international relations, security studies, and East Asia.

Neal Keating

Neal Keating

Associate Professor, SUNY - Brockport

Areas of Specialization: Political ecology and historical ethnography, Indigeneity, globalization, human rights, expressive culture; Southeast Asia, Northeastern North America, and Central America.

 

Current Research Projects:

Ken MacLean

Ken MacLean

Associate Professor, Clark University

Ken MacLean is an Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change, and a faculty member at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology (University of Michigan 2005), a M.S. in Environment Justice (School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Michigan 2004), and a B.A. in Anthropology (Princeton University, 1990). Before coming to Clark University, he was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Institute for Comparative and International Studies (Emory University, 2005-2007).

Duncan McCargo

Duncan McCargo

Visiting Professor, Columbia University & Professor, University of Leeds

Although he is best known for his agenda-setting contributions to current debates on the politics of Thailand, his work is centrally concerned with the nature of power. How do entrenched elites seek to retain power in the face of challenges from new political forces? How do challengers to state power try to undermine the legitimacy of existing regimes? These interests have led him to study questions relating to the elections, protest rallies, uses of media, sub-national conflicts, and the politics of justice, among other issues.

Sudarat Musikawong

Sudarat Musikawong

Associate Professor, Siena College

I believe in my students and advocate for learning in and outside the classroom. I teach Social Impact of Mass Media, Global Cities: Urban Sociology, Globalization/International Studies, Sociology of Southeast Asia, Qualitative Research Methods, US Immigration & International Migration, and Sociological Theory.

Kosal Path

Kosal Path

Assistant Professor, Brooklyn College - CUNY

Kosal Path is assistant professor of political science. He is a survivor of the Cambodian genocide (1975-79). As a researcher for the Cambodian Genocide Program at Yale University and the Documentation Center of Cambodia from 1995 to 2000, he took part in documenting the atrocities committed by the Pol Pot regime. From 2009 to 2011, he taught international relations at the University of Southern California where he received an award of excellence in teaching international relations.

Ermin Sinanovic

Ermin Sinanovic

Director, The Fairfax Institute

Ermin Sinanović is currently the Director of Research and Academic Programs at the International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT), where he is also the Director of The Fairfax Institute. Before joining the IIIT, he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. He studied for an MA and a PhD in Political Science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Prof.

Kathryn Stam

Kathryn Stam

Professor, SUNY Polytechnic Institute

Kathryn R. Stam, Ph.D., is a professor of anthropology at SUNY Polytechnic Institute. She serves as the coordinator of the online master’s program in information design and technology and she teaches undergraduate anthropology. Stam’s specialties are cross-cultural communication, ethnography, Thai and Lao studies, and information technology. Her recent work is a collection and analysis of Northeast Thai memorial books and has been supported by a Fulbright grant and an ENITAS scholarship from the Institute of Thai Studies at Chulalongkorn University.

Deborah Tooker

Deborah Tooker

Professor, Le Moyne College

Tooker, Deborah E., (Ph.D. 1988, Harvard University) is professor of anthropology, department of anthropology, criminology, and sociology at Le Moyne College. Her areas of interest are symbolic/semiotic anthropology and the anthropology of religion/ritual, psychological anthropology, political anthropology and the politics of identity, and the anthropology of space and place.

Andrew Weintraub

Andrew Weintraub

Professor, University of Pittsburgh

Indonesia is a major focus of my research, particularly the musical, narrative, and theatrical practices of Sundanese people in West Java. In my first book Power Plays, I wrote about the art of Sundanese rod-puppet theater wayang golek and its adjustment to political pressures and economic opportunities in a rapidly modernizing society.

Meredith Weiss

Meredith Weiss

Associate Professor, SUNY - Albany

Professor Weiss's research is in the field of comparative politics, focusing on Southeast Asia, especially Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia. Thematically, she explores processes and patterns of political development and mobilization, including such dimensions as electoral patterns and processes, nationalism and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, Islamism, "new media," and coalition-building in both civil society and electoral politics.

Orvil White

Orvil White

Associate Professor, SUNY - Cortland

Future teachers often travel in Professor White’s science methods class. Some go back in time to their elementary school days and some head to Thailand, both studying forces of motion through roller coaster models and properties of water through optical illusions. But make no mistake: the fourth and fifth grade science lessons aren’t designed to be easy. They’re meant to make memories.

“Knowledge is memorable,” Professor White says. “In order to make it memorable for students, there has to be a form of active engagement, or hands-on learning.”

Zucker

Eve Zucker

Visiting Scholar, Rutgers University, Newark

Eve Zucker’s research focuses on the aftermath of mass violence in Cambodia through the lenses of social memory, morality, the imagination, trust and everyday practices. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology from the London School of Economics and her M.A. in cultural anthropology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She has conducted extensive research in Cambodia (2001-2003, 2010) on the topics of memory, morality, and recovery from war and genocide.