You are here

Upcoming Events

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

09/03/2015

"Hair Apparent: Life Process & the Body Politic in 1965 Indonesia."  Kaja McGowan, Director of the Southeast Asia Program (SEAP) and Associate Professor at the Department of History of Art If one were to write the history of the prison in 1965 Indonesia with all the political investments of the body that inheres in its constricted architecture, one compelling ancestrally charged coordinate would be hair. This paper explores life process and the body politic as a set of material elements and techniques that serve as subtle weaponry, a wished for liberation, communicative channels, and supports for the power and gendered relations that invest human bodies and subjugate them by turning them into objects of knowledge. Hair apparent is at the heart (and head)

The Year of Living Dangerously

09/03/2015

1983 > Australia > Directed by Peter Weir With Mel Gibson, Sigourney Weaver, Linda Hunt This story of a journalist in Indonesia just before the 1965 coup is subtly told, strikingly shot and well acted. Cosponsored with the Southeast Asia Program. 1 hr 54 min

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

09/10/2015

“Arrested Autonomy: Posthuman Futures in Sarawak, Malaysia.”  Juno Salazar Parreñas, Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, The Ohio State University. Abstract: The Forestry Corporation, which is the privatized branch of Sarawak’s Forestry Department, has the mandate to protect orangutans, which are Sarawak’s most famous endangered species. The Forestry Corporation cares for displaced orangutans at Sarawak’s two wildlife centers. The goal of these centers is to have displaced orangutans eventually achieve autonomy (kebebasan) within the space of these centers, even as the material constraints of insufficient space and dependency on food support arrests attempts at autonomy. Such indefinitely deferred in

40 Years of Silence: An Indonesian Tragedy

09/10/2015

2009 > USA > Directed by Robert Lemelson In 1965, over half a million people were killed in Indonesia while the world looked away. Four families break the silence in this arresting documentary examining what life was like during General Suharto's New Order regime, and what that means for life in Indonesia today. Cosponsored with the Southeast Asia Program. Subtitled. More at 40yearsofsilence.com 1 hr 26 min

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

09/17/2015

"The Indecency of Adultery: Censorship and Morality in Thai Cinema"  Rebecca Townsend, Doctoral Candidate, Department of History, Cornell University The Thai state dramatically increased the censorship of cinema during the period of authoritarian, military rule from 1958 through 1973. Primarily enforced through the Board of Film Censorship comprised of senior bureaucrats and police officers, official censorship of film evidenced a concern by the Thai state about the impact of depictions of so-called deviant social practices on Thai audiences. The censors most often focused on depictions of sexuality, intimacy, and family relationships, with censors’ attitudes reflecting urban bureaucratic norms of social appropriateness. A large number of films were censored

The Act of Killing

09/17/2015

2013 > Denmark/Norway/UK/Sweden/Finland > Directed by Joshua Oppenheimer In this "dogged, inventive, profoundly upsetting and dismayingly funny documentary about the Indonesian massacres that began in 1965 and claimed, by some estimates, as many as 2.5 million lives over the next year" (NY Times), former death squad leaders reenact their real-life mass-killings in various cinematic genres. In Indonesian and English. Cosponsored with the Southeast Asia Program. Subtitled. More at theactofkilling.com The extended version (30 additional minutes), not previously screened in Ithaca, will be shown. 2 hrs 25 min

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

09/24/2015

"God’s Left Eye Crosses the Pacific: Caodaism’s Transpacific Transformations 1926-2015" Janet Alison Hoskins, Professor of Anthropology and Religion, University of Southern California Abstract: Caodaism is a new religion revealed to a group of colonized intellectuals in southern Vietnam in 1926 who fused Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism with French Spiritism, Theosophy and Catholic hierarchies.  Its syncretistic mixture has always been dynamic, renewed and revised through spirit séances, and often mixed with nationalist aspirations.  After 1975, many Caodai leaders went into exile, establishing congregations in Los Angeles, Orange and Riverside counties.  The initial vision of “bringing the gods of the East and West

The Look of Silence

09/24/2015

2015 > Finland/UK/Norway/Denmark/Indonesia > Directed by Joshua Oppenheimer Adi, an optometrist, investigates the murder of his older brother in the 1965 Indonesian genocide. After tracking the killers down, he confronts them, all while testing their eyesight, asking for them to take responsibility. Considered a companion to Oppenheimer's The Act of Killing, the film has been met with hugely positive reviews. Cosponsored with the Southeast Asia Program. Subtitled. More at thelookofsilence.com 1 hr 43 min

The Look of Silence

09/24/2015

2015 > Finland/UK/Norway/Denmark/Indonesia > Directed by Joshua Oppenheimer Adi, an optometrist, investigates the murder of his older brother in the 1965 Indonesian genocide. After tracking the killers down, he confronts them, all while testing their eyesight, asking for them to take responsibility. Considered a companion to Oppenheimer's The Act of Killing, the film has been met with hugely positive reviews. Cosponsored with the Southeast Asia Program. Subtitled. More at thelookofsilence.com 1 hr 43 min

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

10/01/2015

"New Findings on the Indonesian Killings of 1965-66" Siddharth Chandra, Professor and Director, Asian Studies Center, Michigan State University In terms of sheer scale, the Indonesian killings of 1965-66 comprise the single most traumatic event in independent Indonesia. Fifty years after they were perpetrated, much of what is known about them hinges on anecdotal accounts that are, of necessity, local and limited in their scope. While authors including Cribb, Hughes, Kammen, MacGregor, May, Robinson, and Roosa have enriched the literature with their detailed accounts of the events, to date, there has not been an analysis that systematically compares the experiences of every district in the worst-affected provinces. This project entails a detailed examination of stati

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

10/08/2015

"Politics Bytes: Digital Media and Activism in Indonesia" Merlyna Lim, Canada Research Chair in Digital Media & Global Network Society, Carleton University Merlyna Lim's research interests revolve around the mutual shaping of technology and society, the socio-political history of technology, and the politics and culture of technology, especially digital media and information and communication technology (ICT), in relations to issues of globalization, democratization, and social equity. She interested in theoretical challenges in how we understand how ideologies and power relations are being inscribed in the production and uses of spaces, offline and online, at the local, regional, national, international and transnational level. In investigating

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

10/15/2015

"Smiling at Death: Annichang, Ploy Wang, and the Cultural Psychology of Emotion in Contemporary Thailand" Julia Cassaniti, Assistant Professor Psychological and Medical Anthropology, Department of Anthropology Washington State University Dr. Cassaniti is a psychological and medical anthropologist working on issues of contemporary religious experience in Southeast Asia. Her research is on the intersection of Buddhist philosophy and practice, especially the ways that Buddhist ideas are interwoven into the psychology of everyday life. The research ties into a broader interest in the role of culture in mental practices and processes and their implications for health and well-being. In this talk Dr. Cassaniti will speak on local Thai interpretations of abstract Buddhist con

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

10/22/2015

 "Thai Red Shirt Protests and Radical Vernacular Protest Sound" Ben Tausig, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, Stony Brook University As a global financial crisis rippled through the late 2000s and early 2010s, with mass protest movements rising in its wake, many observers asked a nervous question of keen ethnomusicological interest: where are the protest songs? Focusing on a case study from Thailand's Red Shirt movement in 2010-11, this talk engages with the growing scholarly literature on music, sound, and political dissent that addresses this trenchant but (as I will argue) flawed question. I claim that our inquiries into music and dissent are usefully framed by attending to sonic circulation and aurality by way of sound studies.

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

10/29/2015

"Grand Prix Racing: Thai nationalism and ambiguous Thai (elite) identities." Thak Chaloermtiarana, Professor, Southeast Asian and Thai Asian Studies, Department of  Asian Studies, Cornell University Prince Chulachakrabongse and Prince Birabongse were sent to England to study at Harrow and Eton in the 1920s.  They lived as Thai princes among the British upper class and indulged in past times such as athletics, flying, and motorcar racing.  Bira became a successful race car driver of the White Mouse Racing team managed and financed by Chula.  Bira even won the coveted Gold Star awarded to the best “British” race car driver competing in international races in three consecutive years—1936, 1937 and 1938.  This is a feat that no ot

Book Talk: Shi'ism in South East Asia: 'Alid Piety and Sectarian Constructions

11/04/2015

There has been a rethinking of Islamic ethics and politics, and current problems related to sectarianism and religious diversity in Southeast Asia. To learn more about the complexities of religion in the Muslim world, join us for a Chats in the Stacks book talk with Chiara Formichi, assistant professor of Southeast Asian Studies at Cornell. Her new book Shi'ism in South East Asia (C. Hurst & Co Publishers Ltd., Nov. 2015) is the first work available in any language that critically discusses traditions of 'Alid piety and their modern contestations in the region. Using early manuscripts from Muslim vernacular literatures, she reveals how 'Alid piety has been transformed in relation to more strictly sectarian identifications since the Iranian revolution in 1979. With growin

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

11/05/2015

 "Rounding up: New species and rediscoveries of Asian birds" Pamela Rasmussen, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy & Ornithology, MSU Museum Assistant Professor, MSU Department of Zoology, Michigan State University Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution Only a few new species of birds are named for science worldwide each year, mostly from South America. But since 1988, Rasmussen and co-authors have described 10 new Asian birds and rediscovered three others. Find out more about the continuing process of documentation of biodiversity in Asia’s best-known group of organisms in this talk!

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

11/12/2015

"Sidewalk City: Re-mapping public space in Ho Chi Minh City" Annette Kim, Director, Spatial Analysis Lab (SLAB) Sol Price School of Public Policy University of Southern California   Professor Kim will speak from her book, Sidewalk City, recently published by the University of Chicago Press. http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/S/bo17438244.html In many of the world’s major cities, sidewalks are society's most important but also overlooked public space. Based on fieldwork over 15 years, Kim developed multi-disciplinary methods of spatial ethnography to overcome habitual seeing, and recorded both the spatial patterns and the social relations of how the city’s vibrant sidewalk life is practiced. She transforms this data

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

11/19/2015

"The Future of Genocide in Asia: Burma and Elsewhere" Magnus Fiskesjö, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University The demonizing and mistreatment of the Rohingya in Burma is taking place alongside similarly alarming developments elsewhere in Asia, such as Thailand’s callous treatment of refugees, and the increasing brutality towards internal others by the Chinese state. Together these trends and developments are raising the specter of new genocides in Asia’s future. This is so perhaps especially for Burma, and originally sympathetic international supporters today increasingly worry about the possible prospects of mass killings and genocide which might take place there. In this presentation I would like to assess these concerns

SEAP Gatty Lecture Series

12/03/2015

"From Planters to Planners: Rubber, Development, and War in Southern Vietnam, 1956 to 1975"​ Mitch Aso, Assistant Professor College of Arts and Sciences, Department of History, University at Albany, SUNY This paper explores the social and political meanings of rubber in Vietnam during the 1960s and 1970s.  More than a universal scientific and economic product, rubber was defined by the ways, the locations, and the people by which it was produced.  During the 1960s, rubber became the Republic of Vietnam's (RVN) leading export while the science of rubber in Southeast Asia was undergoing rapid development.  In addition to its economic importance and scientific interest, however, rubber production took on a social and political significance beyond

Find more upcoming events